Clipping My Wings & Productivity

Who says they can just “wing it” when it comes to getting things done?  Typically someone who is underachieving. I had my wings clipped many years ago.  If you are like me, you are busy.  I heard Dan Hayes of the Simple Life Together Podcast (SLT) say “Busy is the New ‘I’m fine’”.  People wear busy as a badge of honor.  Busy without purpose and focus is just a waste of time.  I don’t know about you, but if I’m not going to be productive, I’d much rather do it on the couch than running around in circles.

How do we avoid being busy without accomplishing anything or more likely, busy while accomplishing “little”? Clip your wings! Planning with a purpose, being intentional with and an end in mind changes the nature of your activity beyond filling the day to “feel accomplished” to actually accomplishing things.  Often, a productive day is a shorter day since you move with purpose from one task to the other without wasting time.  Productivity Gurus  David Allen (GTD) and the late Steven Covey (7 habits), talk about goals and objectives.  Take time to plan.  If you aren’t a “planner”, start small.  Here’s a list of 3 things to start with:

RAF Flypast - Red Arrows

RAF Flypast – Red Arrows (Photo credit: Mikepaws)

1.  Define your Goals:  From spring break travel, to organizing the garage for spring, to building a business or planning your retirement, start with the end in mind.  Most people don’t even get this far.  Defining your goals will give you a tangle and “clean” target to work toward.
2. Build your Plan: Creating a simple plan to intentionally achieve some or all of your goals gives you a road map.  Have you ever been driving on a road toward a new destination not sure if you should be going North or South.  The anxiety is torturous.  Once I decide to hit the Onstar button for directions, even if I’ve been going the wrong direction, I get back on track and feel great.  Why? Because I know that I am on the path to my destination.
3. Execute:  There are people who plan but don’t follow through, and there are people who do things but have no plan or direction, and finally there are a group of successful people who do both.  Planning without execution is only a dream.  Create  a plan that is realistic and fits your season in life.  Check in periodically to make adjustments and don’t beat yourself up if you’re not 100% on target.  Keep on Keeping on!
These 3 steps are the foundation to clipping your wings and living intentionally with purpose.  How will you start today to live with purpose and intentionality?
Rocco
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Keeping Pace with Life: Wisdom on the way to school

I recently had the opportunity to share some wisdom with my 17 year old daughter on the drive to school.  Most days the 2.5 mile trek to school is no more than a song or 2 and the click…click of her texting her friends regarding her upcoming arrival. This day was different. College is less than a year away, and with the college discussion comes the life discussion.  What to do, how to live, and what is an acceptible  standard of living.  This 5 minute conversation stirred up some great thinking and some real questions, especially as I reflect upon my life.

Horse Racing

Horse Racing (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

She’s a smart kid.  One of the features she gets from me is the uncanny ability to get things done.  Maybe they aren’t done smoothly (maybe they are), and maybe not according to the plan, but done nonetheless.  Many times she, and i alike, achieved great grades and successful marks without too much challenge. This ability is a double edged sword.
Seeing results without intentionality trains the mind to feel entitled.
I lived, and sometimes still do, this way for many years.  I am happy with my life and career but wonder  what could have been.  I have worked hard to get here, but not always intentional, strategic, and certainly not open to much risk.  The question I posed in our discussion was what if I had added  1 or 2 of those elements to my earlier years (as I am incorporating them now)?
My success today does not mean that I arrived here in spite of my lack of intentionality, strategic thinking, and risk aversion. I believe my success today is just the tip of the ice that could have been massive success beyond what I have achieved today.
This is not to say I am regretful or in any way unhappy with my life.  I love my life and my family.  This is about others, in particular, my 17 year old daughter.  This could be you reading this post today, or your very own 17 year old daughter.  Life is a constant moving object.  You are moving at 1 speed, and life (society, careers, family) is moving at another. I told her that for many years I thought I could find a trajectory and get comfortable.  I even fooled myself that I had arrived there several times. While I never went backward, life kept moving forward.  Soon, life was moving faster than me and I had to catch up.  There have been other times where I have been so overly ambitious that I outpaced life with the power of a bullet train.  The problem with this isn’t my ambition, work ethic, or intelligence; its my perspective.
Move too slow in comfort, life passes you and you live with regrets.  Move too fast and you miss the moments life was designed for.  
I told my daughter that you need to find a pace that is comfortable, sustainable, and slightly faster than the speed of life.
What do you do to keep perspective without loosing out on opportunities?
Rocco

Self Honesty in the Intentional Life

One of my favorite things to do to unwind is walk through the local Barnes and Noble.  The combination of the smell of new books and starbucks brewing bring a creative calm to my heart.  I usually browse through history, current affairs, business and christian living.  I love to read books.  If I could read 10 hours a day, I would.  Perhaps I may even have an addiction to books. My typical “poison” is Non Fiction. I’ve learned from reading well over a thousand books, that every Non Fiction book sells you a perfect life, with steps to this, and steps to that.  All the success, effectiveness, and happiness you could ever dream of in 10 easy steps. Anxiety filled office overhaul day after anxiety filled office overhaul day, I have learned to manage expectations and be real.  There are circumstances in life that are not excuses, and certainly not roadblocks to success.  Managing our specific lives rather than comparing ourselves to others will vastly increase our happiness and drive further effort rather than stifle them in anxious self pity.  I’ve done them all.  Here are some key learnings from my anxiety filled attempt to become everyone but myself.

[ D ] Salvador Dali - Metamorphosis of Narciss...

[ D ] Salvador Dali – Metamorphosis of Narcissus (1937) (Photo credit: Cea.)

1. Don’t compare your work to people in different stages of life or career.  Comparing my blog to Michael Hyatt’s blog is ridiculous. He is the retired CEO of a major publisher, vastly more experienced (by 20 + years I’d guess), and has way more resources than I do.  Compare, instead to novices if that’s where you are.  How do you compare to people just starting out?
2. How much time do you have available? Trying to squeeze in another “thing” is difficult.  Some people can tightly schedule their time, some can’t.  Too rigid a schedule leads to anxiety and no room for life’s inevitable interruptions, especially if you have kids.  Rigidity leads to rushing, which kills creativity. Be realistic about how long things take.  Too many times I see people simply overplaying their hand when it comes to their ability to get things done. If, on average, it takes 30 minutes to mow the lawn, don’t think you can do it in 10.
3.  Live in reality.  You have obligations on your time and energy. Life has seasons.  What season are you in?   Prioritize not just your time, but your energy.  Being honest with your commitment to give effort to a project is perhaps the most important thing you can do for your happiness and success. You can over commit and fake it for a while with other people, but you know if you are out of your comfort zone and will be unhappy. One blog post per week and happiness is better than 5 posts and misery.  It’s not sustainable and is counterproductive.
4. Define your goals.  What are you trying to accomplish.  My goal with this blog is to write for the sake of writing and to get better.  I periodically check in with my motives and compare them with my goals.  If I’m unhappy with my follower count, or engagement, I remind myself that was never my purpose.  Your goals may be different.  Defining them gives you firm ground to stand on.  Self honesty is a must.  Changing goals with the weather doesn’t usually lead to success.
Understanding where you are in the development process and how much time and energy you have and are honestly willing to give toward a defined goal is key to intentional living.
What one thing have you lied to yourself about in the last week?

Rocco

Managing The Tyranny of the Mundane

Every time I go the mall (which with 4 girls in the house is way too often), I get turned around and frustrated.  I go to the giant cube in front of JC Penny and look at the map to find the store I am looking for.  Then, I look for the red star that shows “You are here”.  Then, with a simple geometric shape of directions, I draw a path (avoiding as many toy stores as possible), to my destination. I usually get distracted by a candy store, two diaper changes, and a spilled soda along the way.  With a “diaper-dad” diaper bag, I make the changes, clean the messes and approach my destination with clean children and smiling faces.

Whaddaya Mean I Don't Do Enough Housework?

Whaddaya Mean I Don’t Do Enough Housework? (Photo credit: las – initially)

What is important to you? What do you want to accomplish?  Do you plan on becoming the VP of Marketing, publishing a Novel, releasing a hit album for your Polka band? Your goal is your goal and nobody else’s.  It is up to you to do the steps to get there. Where is your “you are here”?  Life is a series of seasons that change your approach toward your goal but not the goal itself. Tasks such as laundry, vacuuming, homework, and bedtime routines are just as important to achieving your dream as the focus time you spend on your dream. These are like a solid foundation to build upon. If not managed (note, I didn’t say finished) they can be a potential source of distraction, frustration, and even dream death.

There is a time for cleaning and there is a time for dreaming.

Many of these things seem mundane and even time wasters.  They are…if you let them be.  Stressing over simple tasks (although many) while working on your dream, or stressing on your dream while working on your tasks is a sign that you may need to re think a few things.  Usually it’s not a matter of doing less.  A tweak here or there such as waking up 15 minutes earlier 1 day, or being more realistic on how much time things take may do the trick.

Mastering the art of managing the mundane may be one of the most important things you can do to achieve your dream.

Yes! Vacuuming and dishes will get you to the corner office! Be intentional about your time checking  boxes so you can be intentional about building your dream. I recently wrote a “how to” on productive relaxing ( read here) .  Being intentional with your time is knowing you are safe doing what you are doing NOW because you aren’t supposed to be doing something else. Build a list of the boxes you need to check in order to keep your foundation solid.  Agree on duties and fair timeliness with those whom you are accountable.  Be present in every moment, including the mundane.  Those tasks should never be interruptions to your dream and should never cause tension in your family.  Enjoy the journey, not just the dream of the destination.
How do you manage the unending list of tasks that can steal your dream?

Rocco

A Life Well Lived

As someone who values productivity and efficiency, I decided to get a head start on some future projects.   Here is a letter I am writing to address the many,  requests I assume I will get asking me how I became amazingly successful in achieving all my goals.

Worm's Head

Worm’s Head (Photo credit: Calidenism)

I want to get a head start on this since I’ll be busy fishing on Lake Tahoe, or surfing in Hawaii, or playing with great grandkids. Inspired by Eugene O’kelly‘s heart wrenching end of life memoir,  Chasing Daylight, I am sharing with you my perspective on my life,: a life well lived.

Family and Friends,
As I enter the sunset of my life, I am humbled to reflect upon the success I have in every aspect of my life. I have been seen by many as wise, entertaining, influential, and an all around awesome guy. My most coveted awards include “Best Dad Ever”,  “Best Grandpa Ever”, and “Husband of the Year”.  My personal life has been ever as successful as my professional life.  A corporate journey through success and innovation, as well as an award winning international speaker on topics ranging from relationships to productivity, my true professional joy has come from my many best selling fiction and non-fiction books.  Traveling the world sharing my stories has brought me close to the people, You!  Every day, I inspire people to live their dreams and live a life of love and adventure.  The best part of this all is that I have shared my life with a wonderful family. As I slowly fade from public figure to legend, I would be remise if I didn’t share the “secrets” to it all.  Here are 10 things to consider in living a life well lived.
1. Priorities in order:. God, wife, kids, myself, work, everyone else.
2. Do things to help others. Money and fame are side effects.
3. Surround yourself with trusted advisors who will keep you honest.
4. Happy family life equals happy work life.
6. Maintain Friendships and don’t keep score.
7. Wake up early and be passionate about every day.
8. Exercise with purpose. (I have ran at least 2 marathons per year since 2012).
9. Wake up early and don’t waste time on things that don’t matter.
10.  Perfection has never been the goal.   Give maximum effort and the results will follow.
Rocco De Leo Ph.D.
President and CEO of DeLeo Enterprises International
May 29, 2060
How are you living well today?

Be Intentional or be Nothing

Running through the beautiful hills of Murrieta, California, I felt like I was running  underwater.  I couldn’t maintain a respectful speed and my legs were screaming.  I have been a runner for 4 years, and for 3 of those years, I progressively grew faster and gained endurance. This last year, however, I took a step backward. Running was never anything I thought much about.  I put on shoes and ran a specific set of miles and that was is. I had “big picture goals” such as completion of my first half and my first full marathons.  There were certain trials I wished to conquer. Once completed, I didn’t create new goals other than continual running.  Singular achievement goals are great goals to have, but they are achieved and forgotten.. For me, achieving these goals marked the end of key component to my training: intentionality.

Whether running, writing, parenting, or anything important to you in your life, don’t take for granted that you will always move toward your goal “automatically”.  Yes,  it does happen. Sometimes.  Why take the chance?  The tyranny of beginners luck or the honeymoon phase of new endeavors can fool you into thinking things will always be easy. Here’s a list to guide you toward maintaining intentionality and relentless forward movement.
A Marine undergoes water survival training

A Marine undergoes water survival training (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1. Differentiate the daily from the long term goals. Steven Covey pointed out the difference between tasks that are important and urgent (doing laundry, answering the phone, cooking dinner) and those that are important and not urgent (getting your Master’s Degree, exercise, writing a book).
2.  Align high energy (physical and mental) tasks appropriately.  For me, this is typically in the morning before the kids are up.  If you have a spouse, this time should be agreed upon as your time to focus on your high level tasks (writing, research, excersise, etc. ).
3.  Align the mundane tasks (important and urgent) that don’t involve high levels of thinking or creativity to times when you are less creative for you. For me, that’s in the evening after working and i’m distracted by kids’ homework and tired from work.  This is a great time to hang a picture, do dishes, or clean the patio.  Not a great time to research for my book.
4. Write it all down.  It seems as though the one thing all productivity speaker/writers agree on is the absolute necessity of writing things down.  Goals, tasks, ideas.
5. Create an internal sense of urgency.  Guard your quality time from internal distractions such as getting off task (Facebook, twitters, checking the weather) and outside distractions (phone calls, emails, unimportant tasks). You have to REALY want this!
6.  Keep perspective.  Baby cries, 9 year old is sick, wife had a particular bad night not sleeping.  These things happen.  Understand the difference between pause and procrastinate (click here to read my article on this topic). Sometimes the urgent and important trumps the not urgent and important.  It is up to you to maintain contingencies but also keep perspective on when to allow “intrusions’ upon your times. if you are in a positive and intentional workflow, you purpose can handle occasional interruptions.
What are you doing TODAY to be intentional?
Rocco De Leo

Choose the Heroic Life

Becoming a Navy Seal is perhaps, the most physically and mentally challenging experience a human can face. The training school BUDS is a rigorous 24 week challenge of underwater dive, land warfare, and parachute training. The 24 week journey begins with a 3 week orientation leading up to a “hell week” in which the candidates continuously train with minimal sleep. They live by their motto “the only easy day was yesterday”. What makes a person sign up for this? When they leave BUDS, they are strategically deployed to one dangerous crisis after another. Whether it’s rescuing kidnapd sailors from pirates in the Indian ocean or the daring mission to “eliminate” Osama Bin Laden , Seals, live a heroic life of adventure and danger.

St. Augustine writing, revising, and re-writin...

St. Augustine writing, revising, and re-writing: Sandro Botticelli’s St. Augustine in His Cell (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

They are able, as George Sheehan suggests in his 1978 classic Running and Being, to feed a desire within themselves to overcome a daily “element of present danger”, a threat to the status quo that threatens [their]everything. American poet James Agee writes “that in war, many men go well beyond anything that any sort of peace can make for them.” These men are heroes without a doubt. What, then, do they fear? Death? Pain? They fear, the same battle you and are fighting every day. This isn’t simply the struggle to find our purpose, its the epic fight to live out our purpose.You are built for adventure. We are all fighting internal battles. If you choose not to fight, you will decend into a dizzying world of mundane emptiness. The soldier fights an obvious battle for physical survival . He returns home to join our fight. He may or may not be comforted in knowing you that he is not the alone in fighting this battle. We all are soldiers. Some just choose not to fight. Your fight, however, is your fight alone. If you don’t lead yourself into battle, no one will. Your fight is less obvious and against a much more cunning and relentless enemy. Your fight is for a true adventure to discover what your soul desires and to draw arms against resistance. Your mortal enemy is’t a foreign army or a terrorist cell. Your enemy knows you better than any spy or undercover agent. Your enemy is you. The ultimate desire to live a life of holiness and purpose, a life moving forward toward greatness rather than mere survival lives within the heart of every man. Only the heroic person spirit stands up to the internal powers and proudly proclaims adventure and purpose over survival. This is a battle the hero fights every morning when he awakens before the sun and arms himself with the weapons of his own war. This may be the blank page for the writer, the shoes for the runner, or the books for the student. Somedays the battles are glorious invasions of Normandy achieving an overarching goal and driving toward purpose. Somedays are 9/11. The hero doesn’t just lick his wounds and wait to recover. He regroups and plans his next attack. If you are reading this post researching blogs on productivity or purpose, you are winning today’s battle. If you are reading this because you are stalling on your next project, you are loosing. You must recognize that you are made for adventure beyond mere survival. God gave us all free will, intelligence, and talent to do great things to glorify him. To live a purpose and discover it within, loving God, and never giving in to mere survival shall be our battle cry! Be your own hero and inspire others with your awesomeness.
Share today’s battle plan for living your purpose.

Rocco De Leo

Unintended Consequences: Kitchen Trash and Jenga

imageOne of my favorite games is Jenga. You know the game? You stack blocks and carefully remove them without knocking down the growingly cumbersome and wobbly tower until, alas, the blocks are scattered and a winner is crowned. Jenga is fun with blocks, not with piles of kitchen trash. I hate taking out the trash. Someone has always stacked juice boxes, cans, and bottles in a well enginered stack that I simply cannot maneuver. This is especially true on rainy days and in the middle of the night when the prospect of walking outside to dump the smelly remainants of last nights’ pasta bake and fish filet is about as pleasant as eating it. I am usually the unsuspecting victim who chose to volunteer to take the bathroom trash downstairs, or empty the vacum cleaner. In my unwavering kindess to my family, I am often known to pick up those mystery pieces of paper that always finds their way to my kitchen floor. Many times, this ritual is done after a long battle with the dishwasher, homework, and tupperware containers with lids missing in action since the Bush administration. The sinks are wiped shiny clean, the hum of the dishwasher sings in the background and the lights are extinguished for another evening of clean, relaxful slumber. Oh, so I think! Next time, I’ll pretend I don’t see the extra trash.
How many times have you stopped to do something so simple and found yourself facing a monster? Unintended consequences haunt our good itentions. In this case, my intention to clean a “little” has resulted in me cleaning “a lot”. This isn’t simply relegated to the terrible and almost nonsensical analogy of trash can theory. People have debated unintended consequences for years. Gun control is a hot topic. “Gun free zones are safe because there’s no guns allowed.” Sounds simple. Except for the crazy guy who could care less about an ordinance outlawing guns in the local shopping mall. Laws that force small businesses to incur certain costs beyond 50 employees tend to hover around an employee base of 49; not helping the unemployment situation. In many of these cases, the intention was well meaning. Making malls safer and asking employers to provide health insurance are noble goals.
Success is typically not measured by intention, rather than by result. Even more challenging, the result may be two-fold. The expected positive outcome (ie, more people with jobs who have health care) and the unintented consequence (less people with jobs, thus less people overall with healthcare). We must live in reality to achieve real and sustainable success in what we do. You are working hard to build your dream. You work extra hours for that promotion. Missing a few soccer practices, maybe a wedding or a ballet recital? In the end, you may get that promotion. What has it cost you? Time with your kids? Divorce?
Big issues like gun control and trash can theory teach us to think through the course of our actions. You will be measured on the totality of your results. No one will care what your intentions were if there is trash all over the kitchen. What have you done that resulted in a ridiculous unintended consequence?

Rocco De Leo

Are You Failing at Authenticity?

Buzz words are all the buzz these days.  Some are fleeting phrases for a moment in time, while others have staying power and are truly profound.  This isn’t a post on phrases however,  or on the english language.  This is the power one word has over me, and how Jamie hit me over the head with it.  Words hurt, and words mean something.  Authenticity is one of those heavy words that leave a mark when they hit you; like a piece of plywood. While this word strikes me in particular, it is something I have thought about and challenged myself with for a long time.  To be authentic is to be what?  This blog is new to the world, but the ideas shared here on positivity and forward thinking are not new to me.  Not to say I don’t have moments of authenticity failure.  Last night I had a minor financial setback involving my mortgage and a mistake Citibank made with my escrow impound increasing my house payment from mildly uncomfortable to squirming in my seat uncomfortable.  I had about 45 minutes of authentic failure.  I panicked, went immediately to worse case and lost all focus on what was really in front of me.  I fell apart for a few minutes. My beautifully talented fiance’ challenged me.  She questioned if I am actually living the life I write and talk about (imagine that 99% of my material is yet to be blogged-she knows way too much).  Am I full-of-shit?  She stopped me in my tracks.  The Merriam-Webster definition of authenticity  in  this context is simply “not false” or to be “real”.  Authenticity  does not require perfection or even a perfect adherence to one’s own teaching.  The intention (another great word), drive, and desire to live our own teaching must be present.  Credibility can stand challenged if we are falling too short of our own teaching, but “less than perfect” is not “too short”.

The Authenticity  Gremlin can rear it’s ugly head if we feed it our doubt and allow it to grow.  We must certainly challenge ourselves to live our own message.  A pastor mired in adultery, a police officer addicted to drugs, or a teacher cheating on state testing are not areas of “just falling short”.  These are great failures of behavior.  Asking them to be perfect, though is impossible.  The last time I checked, the only sinless person to ever live was nailed to a cross 2000 years ago.  That’s not to say they can’t recover their authenticity. Trust may be challenged and even un recoverable.  Trust is earned and received while authenticity is lived and given away.  Those of us with a message to share (i’d argue that’s actually all of us) will certainly be held to a higher standard when it comes to our message.  You will be your own drill sergeant.  I read my own material because I learn from my own words. I am authentic as long as I share my imperfections.  Living fully with our passions, dreams, and needs/wants, is not easy.  If it was, I wouldn’t have a purpose to write.  You will hit bumps in the road on the way to “dreamville”.  Keep in mind these 3 things along the way to stay authentic:
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1.  Has your message changed? The methods and tools may need to adapt and change, but the message should remain the same.
2.  Do you believe your message NEEDS to be heard or are you trying to SELL something? Intentions are important and dreams are seldom “get rich quick schemes”.
3.  Are others sharing similar messages?  Usually this is a good thing.  Sometimes being the first to share a message is great. but many times you’re the only one sharing it because it’s right (timing may also be a factor) If, after challenging yourself and your message, you discover its uniqueness is what makes it valuable, then by all means, share it with the world.  You’ve done the homework to quiet the Gremlins in your head and are ready to lead the charge.
    You know your true authenticity.  Check in with yourself.  Utilize a system to evaluate your progress on a monthly or quarterly basis.  I like Getting things Done (GTD) or Seven Habits.  The point is to take a look at your map every once in a while to make sure true authenticity.
Rocco De Leo
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Turn your Anxiety into Ambition

A stack of books on my nightstand, twenty five blog ideas, ten podcast ideas, miles to run, and many more to-dos. Success starts first from an idea where you want to go and a plan on how to get there. The little voice in my head “the resistance” as Steven Pressfield coined, tells me that it’s just too much. I’m cranky, frustrated and finding it hard to focus on getting one thing done, let alone getting all these things done. This is my inner self sore from several weeks of a new driven ambition. Much like taking on a new physical routine, my body, or my inner voice is sore. Anxiety, in this sense is ambition in disguise. Anxiety, left alone, will ruin my plans and turn up the volume on my resistance. Anxiety re focused into ambition will be one of the best natural drivers to success and a “mute” button to the inner voice of resistance.Here is a step by step guide to ensure anxiety morphs into ambition.

1. Organize and write down my goals. Include time lines to let me know what I must do and what I can be comfortable NOT doing until later. If it is planned to be on hold, it is not procrastination, it is strategy.

2. Align a strategic plan with my goals. Once I know my target, now I am ready to aim. Starting with the end in mind, I work backward on how to achieve my goals. I will be publishing my goals on this blog soon using this methodology.

3. Align daily tactics with reality. What is it going to take on a daily basis to chip away toward my strategic plan? Planning time to work towards these goals with daily tactics (simply stated: tasks) is key to achieving my plan. This is where the rubber meets the road. Knowing that I have done the proverbial math and discovered that reading blogs 1 hour per day from 6-7 am will ultimately work toward achieving my goal tells my inner voice that enough is enough; no need to read 2 hours per day. Even if I hear Guy Kawasaki reads blogs 3 hours per day, my plan tells me I am not Guy Kawasaki and never plan on being him.

4. Take multiple second looks at the plan. First and foremost, having a plan makes me feel better and makes me actually work better. This is nothing new or profound. It is common sense. Re evaluating my plan periodically (the time frame will depend on the user) will help correct for un forseable situations and over-under ambitious planning.

5. Trust my plan. Be confident in my plan. I am smart and know what I am doing. I trust my plan to get me there. Re routing mid flight without careful analysis will assure failure to reach my ultimate destination. Turbulence in flight as well as in life is expected. Hunkering down and pushing through takes trust in the plan.

What is your voice of resistance telling you today?

Rocco De Leo